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New Grand Lodge Building in Holden

Grand Lodge of Maine

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons

District Education Representative's Manual

M.E.A.L.S. Committee rev. 2006

TABLE OF CONTENT

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THE PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF DISTRICT EDUCATION REPRESENTATIVES

As a District Education Representative you are part of the District team but not subordinate to the District Deputy, but you have distinct responsibilities, specifically relating to Masonic Education.

 

  1. To encourage and promote candidate and general Masonic instruction for Lodge members in each Lodge in your District and to provide tools and resources made available by the Masonic Education and Lodge Service Committee. You will need to be familiar with the Instructor’s Manual.
  2. To present or help Lodges present short programs from the “Toolbox” or other resources. The programs in the “toolbox” are intended for use by you with the assistance of Brethren in attendance and are ten to fifteen minutes in length. You may take a part or simply set up and direct others to take parts. They are usable right out of the box, without rehearsal.
  3. To provide the Masonic Education and Lodge Service Committee with an annual report.
  4. To recommend a Lodge in your District for the Raymond Rideout Award. It is YOUR responsibility to nominate a Lodge for the Raymond Rideout Award, not any other officer in your District.

Materials available from the Grand Lodge Office:

  1. DISTRICT EDUCATION REPRESENTATIVE’S TOOLBOX
  2. INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL* (revised Pollard Plan)
  3. HAND-OUT SHEETS FOR USE BY CANDIDATES AND INSTRUCTORS
  4. LODGE OFFICERS MANUAL .

FORMS

  • Candidate Progress Reporting Form
  • Raymond Rideout Award nomination
  • REPRESENTATIVES MANUAL
  • HIRAM’S HANDBOOK
  • HIRAM’S TRESTLE BOARD
  • VIDEOS
    • Masonic Protocol Tape
    • Candidate Education Tapes
      • i. Accepted Candidate
      • ii. Entered Apprentice
      • iii. Fellow Craft
      • iv. Master Mason
  • GUIDE FOR DISTRICT DEPUTIES

The Instructor’s Manual is available from the Grand Secretary at a cost of $ 5.00.

Candidate Progress Report

Image of the Candidate Progress Report

2006-2007 Raymond Rideout Award Nomination For Outstanding Masonic Education

___________________ Lodge # _____ in _____________________ Maine ___  Masonic District.

Describe what the Lodge is doing Candidate Education Program in each of the following areas – Accepted Candidate, Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, Master Mason, 4th Night Program.

 

If this Lodge uses the Elder Brother program, please describe it.

 

Describe what the Lodge uses for Candidate Education resources and how used.

 

Describe any presentations used for General Membership Education.

 

Describe why this Lodge merits your recommendation.

Guidelines for the Raymond Rideout Nomination Form

The description of the Lodge’s Candidate Education Program may include several elements. It is more than learning the ritual lesson. Lodges may use a Committee or Education Chairman/Coordinator and how they function with each new member. Each individual Lodge may not use the 4th Night Program, especially if there is one held on a District level. Some Lodges will use the parts of the 4th Night Program in other ways, some examples are: individual instruction on balloting, use of the Maine Masonic Textbook and Masonic Protocol during the course of the sessions following each Degree.

In the description of the Elder Brother concept, examples are: an Elder Brother assigned for each candidate, how they follow up, their duties, how long they serve.

The extent the Lodge uses Candidate Education resources such as Instructors Manual and Education Tapes and/or other resources used.

Please describe what presentations or events the Lodge has held for general Membership Education, such as speakers or special programs.

What outstanding qualities has this Lodge demonstrated that should merit your recommendation? Any additional documentation, which underlines or demonstrates what makes this Lodge special, would be helpful.

This nomination is due, postmarked by February 28th. Nominations submitted after this date will not be considered.

The form should be returned to:

Chairman, Masonic Education & Lodge Service Committee

 

Programs for Lodges

One of the District Education Representative’s duties is to provide the lodges within his district with informative presentations.

  1. The MEALS Committee provides its District Education Representatives with a series of short programs on Masonic subjects designed to be interesting and informative. These programs are collectively referred to as the TOOL BOX.
  2. These programs offer the District Education Representative an opportunity to involve other Masons from his district or within a particular lodge to join in the presentations. Participant involvement is important.
  3. The District Education Representative should actively pursue opportunities to present these programs and lodge meetings or any other appropriate Masonic or public function. DO NOT WAIT FOR A CALL.
  4. Below are examples of approaches which might be used in speaking to masters of lodges when seeking opportunities to present programs form the tool box:

    I know that you have been interested (or concerned) about balloting (or some other topic) in your lodge. I would like to make a brief presentation at you next communication on this subject. I feel certain the brethren will find it instructive and interesting.

    Or

    As District Education Representative I have a number of interesting and informative programs. Each takes approximately xx minutes and can involve brother in your lodge. Would you look through these possibilities with me and see what programs would be of special interest to you and your lodge?

    Or

    I will be attending your lodge on your next communication. I notice that you have no degree work scheduled, and I would like to present a brief program on xx/xx/xx which will be both entertaining and of interest to the brethren. It will take approximately xx minutes. When could we schedule this presentation?

The District Representatives Role in the Education of Candidates

Why is Candidate Education so Important?

  1. Masonry through its ritual and degrees provides men with a great journey in search of significance.
  2. This journey demands an active employment of mind and heart on the part of the candidate as well as assistance from knowledgeable brethren.
  3. While good ritual work is essential, each candidate needs and desires the opportunity to discuss his degree experience and to explore its application to his own life.
  4. To fill these vital needs of our candidates, each lodge should have a Candidate Education Chairman who with the help of other brethren will assist candidates in the exploration of life provided in the ritual and other Masonic sources.
  5. The District Education Representative has a duty to help Masters of Lodges form Candidate Education Committees, provide informative materials for their use, and to help them prepare to work with candidates.
  6. The MEALS Committee has designed materials in the form of education videos and resource manuals for use of the District Education Representative and the lodge Candidate Education Committees. In addition the MEALS Committee will provide periodic training sessions for its District Education Representatives.
  7. It is the responsibility of the District Education Representative to:

    i. Attend all training programs provided for them by the MEALS Committee.

    ii. To become familiar with materials provided.

    iii. To assist the Masters of the Lodges within his District in the organizing of candidate support teams, to provide these teams with materials, and to help them succeed in their mission. These teams may consist of Candidate Education Chairman, Candidate Instructor and Elder Brother.

Outline and Goals of Education Program for Candidates

REVIEW OF GOALS FOR OUR EDUCATION PROGRAM

OVER-ALL GOAL: To provide an education program, which will make them more knowledgeable masons and which will offer them opportunities to improve themselves and grow in wisdom.

SPECIFIC GOALS

  1. To make certain that candidates and new Master Masons have the opportunity to review the ritualistic experiences encountered in the degree work and that they are properly prepared for each new step in their Masonic journey. (See page four in introductions to Instructor's Manual.)
  2. To assure that the candidates and new Master Masons acquire a firm foundation in rudiments of Masonic philosophy, protocol, and Lodge organization. (See page three in the introduction to the Instructor's Manual.)
  3. To provide the atmosphere and encouragement in which the candidate and new Master Mason will be able to discover what Freemasonry means to him as an individual. (See page three of introduction to Instructor's Manual.)
  4. To inspire an interest on the part of the new Mason, which will lead to future study and encourage him to become an active member of his Lodge.

THE CHOICE OF INSTRUCTORS

Good instructors have both the time and the interest to do the job. In addition, knowledgeable brethren who are not officers need to be given an opportunity to serve the Craft. Therefore we should select our instructors, in so far as possible, from those brethren not holding lodge offices. The following characteristics may help in identification and selection of instructors:

  1. A conviction that Masonic Education is important.
  2. Enthusiastic feelings about the importance of the Fraternity.
  3. Consideration and compassion for others.
  4. Given to discussion rather than argumentation.
  5. A desire to know more about Freemasonry.
  6. Secure enough to admit when they do not know - sincere enough to look up the answer.
  7. A fair background in the ritual and in Masonic practices. (Note. the program does not call for Masonic experts but rather those who themselves are eager Masonic students.)
  8. Willingness to participate in future training sessions in order to improve their instructional skills.

An Outline for for a Talk on Our Candidate Education Program

I. IS THERE A NEED FOR INCREASED MASONIC EDUCATION FOR CANDIDATES AND NEW MASTER MASONS?

A. HOW MUCH DID WE REMEMBER AFTER FINISHING THE THREE DEGREES?

B. WE ARE FINDING THAT MASTER MASONS REMEMBER VERY LITTLE OF THEIR EXPERIENCES DURING THE DEGREES. (Speaker may wish to ask whether the general lack of Masonic knowledge along with the failure to understand the importance of Freemasonry has anything to do with poor lodge attendance, difficulty in finding good officers, and the apparent lack of interest in Masonry.)

II. CONSIDER JUST HOW MUCH CONFRONTS A MAN WHILE TAKING THE DEGREES.

(Speaker may wish to list some of the subjects introduced during degrees - see the introduction to the Instructor's Manual under the heading of "The Need".)

III. THERE IS NO DOUBT THAT WE NEED THE BEST OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS IF WE ARE TO HELP THE CANDIDATE AND NEW MASTER MASON FIND LIGHT AND MEANING IN HIS MASONIC EXPERIENCE.

IV. OUR EDUCATION PROGRAM PROVIDES THE MEANS TO:

A. Review the major teaching of each degree.

B. Help the candidate to discover the meaning of Masonic degree instruction.

C. Build upon the individual candidate's strengths and needs.

D. Give an opportunity to correct misconceptions and faulty information.

E. Provide the opportunity to demonstrate the fellowship of learning and the fraternity of caring for each individual, which characterize the Fraternity. (Speaker can doubtless think of other characteristics. The introduction to the Instructor's Manual provides a good source.)

V. THE PROGRAM

A. The Instructor's Manual is the foundation of your program. It is written as a source book for instructors giving background, references and suggestions for instruction so that the instructor can modify the program to fit the candidate's needs. The manual contains handout materials, vocabulary list and annotated texts of the Pollard Plan booklets. (See attached outline, which can be used at this point.)

B. Organization of Program

  1. The Committee on Masonic Education and Lodge Services provides materials.
  2. The District Education Representatives act as field agents for the Committee by coordinating, organizing, evaluating and helping to maintain a high level of instruction.
  3. The Lodge Education Coordinator administers the program at the lodge level.
  4. The Candidate instructors work with candidates and new Master Masons under the coordinator's direction

VI. WE NEED YOUR HELP !

A. You need not be an expert teacher nor an expert on Freemasonry.

B. You do need to be willing to learn, convinced of the importance of Freemasonry, and concerned for your fellow man.

HINTS FOR FORMING AND MAINTAINING PROGRAMS

There are no simple recipes that will guarantee success in forming and maintaining Masonic education programs in the lodges within your district. However, there are some specific strategies and approaches that have been tested and have been proven to be successful in meeting this important objective. These have been outlined in the hope that they might be helpful to you in fulfilling your duties as a District Education Representative. It should be pointed out at the outset that these strategies and approaches are supported by one and the same foundation and that foundation is commitment, dedication and hard work.

  1. THE FIRST PREREQUISITE - The first prerequisite for meeting with success is having a firm belief in what you are doing and having confidence in yourself that you can carry out your responsibilities and duties as a District Education Representative. If these factors are not present the chances of your meeting with success are minimal.
  2. A STARTING POINT - There is an old saying to the effect that "you won’t know where you're going if you don't know where you've been". If you don't have a clear picture of the status of the education program within your district or the value that the individual lodges place on Masonic education, then it might prove to be helpful for you to conduct a needs assessment. A needs assessment can be done in a very formal way or informally but the underlying principle of a needs assessment is that it will help you to assess the quality and quantity of Masonic education in your district and identify areas of need. It is strongly recommended that such an assessment be planned and carry out in collaboration with the District Deputy Grand Master.
  3. USING THE RESULTS OF THE NEEDS ASSESSMENT TO PLAN A COURSE OF ACTION -After the needs assessment has been completed, list the needs in priority order and develop a list of objectives for meeting those needs. Then develop a list of "suggested" activities that can be carried out to meet those needs. Realistically, if you want to meet with success don't attempt to work on more than three objectives at any one time. At this point you will have a plan of action that should provide you with a sense of direction and purpose.

    An alternative to setting up needs and objectives on a priority basis is to establish short and long term objectives. You can then focus your energies on meeting those objectives that won't take a great deal of time to achieve, while planning the steps that will be necessary for meeting the long term objectives. Be sure you set realistic objectives that are objectives that will have a high success rate. Unrealistic objectives lead to frustration, despair and discouragement. Success, on the other hand, breeds success.

  4. COMMUNICATING YOUR OBJECTIVES TO LODGES IN THE DISTRICT – Once you have established your objectives and a plan of action for meeting them, it is important that they be communicated to the lodges in your district. An effective way to accomplish this is to begin by sending a letter to the masters of the lodges in the district and soliciting their cooperation and help and letting them know that you are ready and willing to assist them in planning, implementing and carrying out education programs in their lodges. Follow this up within a two-week period to set up a personal meeting to discuss your objectives and the types of assistance that you can provide in detail. It is not advised that this be done over the phone for that makes it too easy to say no or be noncommittal. A personal meeting is more apt to result in cooperation and commitment.
  5. ESTABLISH CREDIBILITY - When you receive a request from a lodge for assistance in planning and implementing an education program, it is imperative that you follow through on that request enthusiastically and promptly. This is a key ingredient in establishing credibility. . When a lodge knows it can count on you for assistance, it will not hesitate to make use of your services. Without credibility, a lodge will quickly forget you.
  6. BE VISIBLE - There is another old saying to the effect, "out of sight, out of mind". Maintain visibility by trying to visit other lodges in your district as often as you can and continually communicate to the masters and others that you are ready, willing and able to assist them with their education programs. Attend meetings of the Masters and Wardens Association whenever possible. This will also provide you visibility and demonstrate that you have a genuine interest in Masonry in your district. Likewise, attend district schools of instruction and other district meetings. Be an active participant in these meetings whenever possible.
  7. BE KNOWLEDGEABLE ABOUT THE EDUCATION RESOURCES THAT YOU CAN DRAW UPON - There are some excellent Masonic films and videos available through the Grand Lodge of Maine and Kora Temple Shrine. If you are aware of any lodges who put on plays, don't hesitate' to call upon them. Experience has shown that they enjoy and appreciate performing for other lodges. Communicate these resources to the Masters of the lodges in your district.
  8. BE KNOWLEDGEABLE ABOUT THE GRAND LODGE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM FOR CANDIDATES -Read thoroughly the instructor's manual for the instruction of candidates and newly raised Master Masons. This does not mean that you have to become an expert yourself, although this is advisable. This will increase your credibility when you work with lodges in your district to implement programs for Candidate Education.
  9. MODEL CANDIDATE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS WHENEVER POSSIBLE - It has been found that lodges are more highly motivated to implement instructional programs for candidates when there is an individual available to model Candidate Education for them. If you, as District Education Representative, feel comfortable in doing this, it will help you to establish credibility. If you don't feel comfortable, try to find a resource person that you can call on. Your District Deputy Grand Master should be able to assist you in locating such a person.
  10. MAINTAINING EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN YOUR DISTRICT - The steps for maintaining successful and effective education programs in your district are basically the same for forming education programs. Assess the effectiveness of the programs that have been established, determine any areas that can be improved upon, establish objectives that will improve and/or sustain those programs and continue to establish and maintain lines of communication with the lodge masters. This is an on-going process, which is necessary for maintaining success.

Masonic Protocol Tape Contents:

  1. Recommended Order Of Business
  2. Examination Of Visitors
  3. Receiving The Grand Master
  4. Avouching
  5. Introduction Of First Time Visitors
  6. Entering An Opened Lodge
  7. Lodge Room Behavior
  8. Balloting
  9. Masonic Memorial Service
  10. Jurisprudence

Masonic Memorial Serivce

The information concerning the Masonic Memorial Service is partially derived from the Maine Masonic Textbook. More specific information can be obtained on pp. 262-3. The Committee on Masonic Education and Lodge Service is offering the following suggestions in order that the purpose of the service become clearer in the minds of the lodge officers who are performing it. We must note, however, that circumstances will vary because of the way the funeral home is arranged, where the deceased is placed and where the family is seated. The Grand Master has approved the use of these services even though the body or the ashes are not present, in either of the latter two cases, the word "symbolically" (shown in parentheses below) should be inserted in the service and only the Master will place the apron and the evergreen in an appropriate place.

I. Officers’ positions.

A. The Master should stand at the head of the casket, facing family and friends.

B. The Chaplain should stand at the foot of the casket, facing the center of the room.

C. The Deacons should stand with crossed rods (if desired), next to the Master.

D. The Stewards should stand with crossed rods (if desired), next to the Chaplain.

E. Remaining officers and brethren

  1. Should remain in their seats until end of service.
  2. If seats are not available, the officers and brethren should stand at the head and foot of the casket next to the Deacons and Stewards. Note; It is imperative that the sight line be clear so that the Master and Chaplain can see the family and friends of the deceased. Actually the Master is performing the service for the deceased, but he does address the family and friends.

II. The Apron: Statement is made by the Master.

A. "He will now (symbolically) wear that apron forever as the emblem of the virtues it represents." (As the Master concludes this statement, he holds up the apron by the two upper corners with the flap toward him and places it over the edge of the casket, allowing the strings to fall within the casket.)

III. The Evergreen: Statement is made by the Master. "In accordance with our custom, I now place (symbolically) this Evergreen over the heart of our brother." (The Master brings his right hand to his left breast, then extends it, palm downward, over the casket, depositing the Evergreen, then carries it above his head pointing to Heaven and then drops arm and hand to side.)

B. Other officers and brethren deposit their Evergreen in like manner at end of the service.

Conclusion; It is important that this service be rehearsed.

*** This subject is demonstrated on track 9 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

Masonic Protocol

THE LODGE

I. The term is used in two senses.

a. "A certain number of Masons, duly assembled" (Not to be confused with a Lodge room or a Lodge hall)

OFFICERS

1. Elective

a. Determined by Lodge By-laws

b. Usually only Master, Senior and Junior Wardens and Treasurer and Secretary

c. Some Lodges elect all officers

d. Chosen separately by ballot at annual meeting

e. Term - usually for one year or until successor is installed

f. Campaigning or nominations are not allowed

f. Master and Wardens cannot resign

h. Master may appoint an acting officer to fill a vacancy

i. In the absence of the Master, the following may preside:

(1). Senior Warden

(2). Junior Warden

(3). A Past Master

2. Appointive

a. Appointed by Master at annual meeting after he is installed

b. Term - same as elective

c. May resign at any time if Lodge By-laws so provide

d. Master may fill a vacancy at any meeting

3. Duties

a. Spelled out in installation ceremonies

b. Each officer should become familiar with his duties

MASONIC TITLES

1. Brother

a. Entitled after taking Entered Apprentice obligation

2. Worshipful

a. Entitled after installation as Worshipful Master

3. Very Worshipful

a. Entitled - Assistant Grand Lecturer, District Education Representative

4. Right Worshipful

a. Entitled - Elected Grand Lodge officers: Deputy Grand Master, Sr. Grand Warden, Jr. Grand Warden, Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary

- Appointive: District Deputy Grand Master and Grand Lecturer

5. Most Worshipful

a. Entitled – Grand Master

6. Past Officers

a. Highest title attained is retained for life

7. Use of titles.

a. In Lodge – On introduction always use Masonic Title with full name or last name Examples; R.W. Robert M. Jones or R.W. Bro. Jones

b. In Lodge – Direct address, “Brother” is always appropriate. The title may be used once in a conversation.

c. Do not use title and first name only in direct address or in correspondence; i.e. Bro. Bob..

d. In public - Titles not are used except preferably between Brethren.

e. In correspondence - Titles are used on letters, but not on envelopes.

SALUTATIONS

1. Due-guard given to

a. Worshipful Master or presiding officer from rear of altar on entering or retiring from an opened Lodge.

b. Wor. Master or presiding officer when addressing him.

c. Due-guard and sign given in place for each degree with Grand hailingsign at the opening of M.M. Degree; F.C. Degree only the first two due-guards and signs; and the E.A. Degree only the first due-guard and sign. Private Grand Honors - due-guards and signs as given in M.M. opening, except no Grand Hailing Sign. (See Grand Honors)

ENTERING AN OPENED LODGE

1. Member or frequent visitor.

a. The Tyler can avouch for he causes an alarm at tyled door - J.D. responds at the order of the W.M., reports to the W.M. that X number of brethren are without, properly clothed and avouched for and wish to gain admission; permission granted, they enter, approach rear of Altar and give due guard of Degree.

b. Tyler should be aware of the progress of the meeting and determine when a Brother should be admitted.

c. No one should be admitted during Degree work nor balloting – should wait for break after first section.

d. Emergency calls, from without for a member in a meeting should be delayed until a break or the Tyler should use discretion and send a message by a Brother seated near the preparation room door. No alarm at tyled door during work.

2. Visitor for the first time.

Must be avouched for or examined (see both of these sections).

***

This subject is demonstrated on track 6 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

***

This subject is contained in the District Representative’s Toolbox .***

AVOUCHING

1. General procedure.

a. Address the Senior Warden.

b. Give no signs.

c. Avouch only if you have sat in an opened Lodge with visitor.

d. A member of the Examining Committee can avouch for a visitor who has passed the examination.

e. A Brother who will be absent from a meeting can avouch for a visitor only if he has sat in a Lodge with him, and can avouch for him in the presence of a Brother who will attend that meeting. This must be done in person and not over the phone.

***

This subject is demonstrated on track 4 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

***

This subject is contained in the District Representative’s Toolbox .***

GREETING VISITORS AND MEMBERS

1. Before the meeting. Senior Warden’s obligation

a. Meet and greet ail members.

b. Seek out all first-time visitors.

c. Make certain they are introduced to W.M. and other officers.

3. In Lodge room the Master.

a. Introduces first-time visitor formally.

b. Accords Grand Honors to those who are entitled.

c. Invites Past Masters and/or special visitors to seat in East.

***

This subject is demonstrated on track 5 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

***

This subject is contained in the District Representative’s Toolbox .***

THE MASTER'S HAT

1. Symbol of authority and part of Master's regalia.

a. Should be worn while presiding.

b. Can be worn by W.M., M.W.G.M., or Past Master when presiding.

c. Must be removed during prayer.

d. Must be removed at the Altar during the obligation – placed on floor, not on base of Altar.

e. Must be removed when Grand Master is present or when D.D.G.M. is presented at official visitation (inspection). Master may replace hat during work of the evening.

f. Should be removed when the S.W. or J.W. are presiding during Degree work and Master is filling their station.

g. May be removed by Master briefly during Degree work to rest his head - should use his discretion.

DRESS

  1. Grand Officers when visiting a Lodge should dress as least as well as the presiding Master
  2. Officers
    1. No robes allowed - See Digest of Decisions pages 20 and 76.
    2. Ordinary business suits are acceptable.
    3. Dark suits, white shirts, ties, dark shoes recommended.
  3. Members should dress in a dignified, not sloppy manner.

LODGE ROOM BEHAVIOR

1. No one should pass between the East and the Altar while the Bible is open.

a.  Master relies on the Great Light (Holy Bible) to rule and govern his Lodge. Line of vision should never be broken.

b. Exception - during Degree work Officers may pass this way in a clockwise motion while conducting candidate.

2. Lodge at Labor.

a.  No audible conversation or noise that will distract the attention of the candidate or interrupt the business of the Lodge.

b.  No one may leave the Lodge room without the permission of the Worshipful Master.

3. Lodge at Ease.

a. Same as Lodge at Labor except that the Brethren, may converse quietly.

b.  No one should move about or leave lodge room without permission of the W.M.

4. Lodge at Refreshment.

a. This is a Masonic term meaning "Recess".

b. It is permissible to leave the Lodge room.

c.  Craft is under the direction of the Junior Warden. He is responsible for the general welfare of the membership.

***

This subject is demonstrated on track 7 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

***

This subject is contained in the District Representative’s Toolbox .***

BALLOTING

  1. The Master reads petition - instructs Brethren on method of balloting.
  2. The Senior Deacon prepares ballot box.
  3. The Master inspects ballot box.
    1. Make certain that there are enough white balls for each member present.
    2. Make certain that there are at least six (6) black cubes.
  4. The Master declares ballot open.
  5. The Senior Deacon may convey ballot box from member to member or it may be placed on a table behind Altar - NEVER ON THE ALTAR. The Senior Deacon must avoid passing between Master and the Altar.
  6. After all members have voted the Master declares ballot closed.
  7. The Senior Deacon will present the ballot to the J.W. and S.W. for inspection if directed by the Master, they do not report whether the ballot is clear or not.
  8. The Master examines ballot, destroys it and then reports.
    1. Two or more black cubes mean petition is rejected.
    2. One black cube - ballot may be taken a second time immediately.
    3. One black cube on second ballot - petition is rejected.
  9. No one enters or retires during balloting.
  10. No member excused from balloting, except by unanimous vote of the Lodge.
  11. The Tyler may be excused by the Master.
  12. There is always a separate Ballot for each petition.
  13. See Text Book and Lodge by-laws.

This subject is demonstrated on track 8 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

This subject is contained in the District Representative’s Toolbox .***

FORMAL RECEPTION OF THE GRAND MASTER

Since a visit by the Grand Master is usually known in advance by the officers of a Lodge, preparations can be made, and possibly a rehearsal held in order that the affair may be run smoothly.

The Grand Master is usually accompanied by his own Grand Marshal, and the Grand Marshal will meet with the Master of the Lodge before the meeting is opened and advise him of the Grand Master’s wishes.

These plans for a formal reception are usually as follows:

The Grand Marshal knocks at the door of the Lodge immediately after it is tiled, and when this is acknowledged, he asks the Senior Deacon to inform the Master that the Grand Master is in waiting and wishes to be received in the Lodge. The Master will then ask his own Marshal to form a procession of the two Stewards and the two Deacons and wait upon the Grand Master. When this procession arrives at the ante-room, the Grand Marshal will direct the Stewards to head the procession and the Deacons to bring up the rear. The Grand Marshal will already have formed his own procession according to Masonic Protocol and he will enter the Lodge Room immediately after the two Stewards. The Stewards will stop inside the door, step aside, face each other and raise their rods over the procession. The Grand Marshal announces "The Grand Lodge of Maine" and the Master will then immediately give three raps to raise the Lodge.

The procession marches to the rear of the altar in double file, halts at the altar, opens rank, faces inward while the Grand Marshal goes to the rear of the column and escorts the Grand Master to the rear of the altar and introduces him to the Master of the Lodge. (While this is going on, the Lodge Marshal, Stewards, and Deacons quietly retire to their respective places.) The Master asks the Grand Marshal to escort the Grand Master to the East, where he is welcomed by the Master and in turn introduced to the Brethren, at the conclusion of which he is given the Private Grand Honors at the request of the Master, taking cue from the Grand Marshal. The Master then presents his gavel to the Grand Master, who will probably hold it until the completion of the introductions by the Grand Marshal. As the rest of the officers in the procession are introduced by the Grand Marshal, they will advance to the rear of the altar, salute the Master, and then advance to the East, forming lines facing inward on the South and North sides alternately. The Grand Master will then introduce his Marshal, and all the officers will then be given the Public Grand Honors at the request of the Grand Master. The Grand Master will then, usually, use the gavel to seat the Lodge and return the gavel to the Master and ask him to continue with the opening.

The Grand Master should be the last one to speak on the program for the evening, and after he speaks, the Master may invite the Grand Master to close the Lodge. No one should speak after the Grand Master, not even to make an announcement.

(This same format may be used for the Reception of the DDGM on his official visitation.)

*** This subject is demonstrated on track 3 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

GRAND HONORS

Grand Honors are of two kinds: Public and Private. Each is given differently, and is intended for use on designated occasions as mentioned below. The manner in which Grand Honors are given and used as adopted by the Grand Lodge in 1940 is as follows:

Public

A - How Given

Public Grand Honors are given "by crossing the arms upon the breast, the left uppermost, the tips of the fingers touching the points of the shoulders, and bowing three times with arms thus crossed." This form was adopted in 1894.

B-When Used

Public Grand Honors are to be used in all public ceremonies, which require the use of Grand Honors. They may be used also as a token of esteem "in receiving all Grand Lodge officers of our own or other Grand Jurisdictions, with the exceptions as noted under Private Grand Honors, and for permanent members of our own Grand Lodge."

Private

A - How Given

Private Grand Honors consist of the due guards and signs of the three degrees, each given on the step of the degree. These Private Grand Honors may be given" ‘in procession’ or 'in place’ whichever is desired by the Grand Officer to be received, or as may be most expedient; if given ‘in procession’ each Brother when reaching the East stops and faces the East and on step of degree gives due guard and sign of the first degree the first time around the hall, of the second degree the second time around, and of the third degree the third time around.”

B - When Used

Private Grand Honors shall be used when:

(a) A Masonic Hall is to be dedicated; unless semi public

(b) A new lodge is to be constituted; unless semi public

(c) A new Master-elect is to be installed; unless semi public

(d) The Grand Master or his official representative is to make an official visitation to a Lodge; unless semi public

These Honors may also be accorded to Past Grand Masters of our own or other Grand Jurisdictions.

The manner in which the Grand Lodge, Grand Lodge officers or Visitors should be received is described in Chapter VII, pages 76-80 in the Maine Masonic Text Book.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COMMITTEE OF INQUIRY

The best interests of Masonry demand that an exhaustive investigation be made of the character and reputation of every applicant. It is imperative therefore, that your investigation of the petitioner be thorough.

Members of Committees of Inquiry are urged to become familiar with those sections of the Grand Lodge Constitution which relate to applications (See Index-page 61) and also the section on "Application" in the Maine Masonic Text Book (1966 edition) pages 225233.

Following are the more important points on which you will wish to check:

  1. Ascertain definitely if the lodge has jurisdiction over the petitioner.
  2. Ascertain definitely if the petitioner has any physical condition which might prevent him from being instructed in the arts and mysteries of Freemasonry, or cause an inability to acquire the means of subsistence.
  3. Ascertain whether the petitioner is mentally qualified to receive Masonic Degrees.
  4. Ascertain whether the petitioner is morally fit to be received into the Fraternity.
  5. Ascertain if any organization to which he belongs will impair his usefulness to the Fraternity.
  6. Ascertain if his neighbors, acquaintances and employers give him a good character reference.
  7. Check his answers to the questionnaire attached to his petition and see that ail are fully answered. If any questions have not been answered, interview the petitioner and have the same completed, or ascertain the reason for his not answering such questions.
  8. Consider the petitioner’s ability to meet his financial obligations with particular reference as to his reputation in meeting his obligations, and whether or not the payment of lodge dues would be in any way a financial burden to those dependent upon him. This is a good time to brief the petitioner as to the fees relating to the degrees.
  9. Do not make a favorable recommendation unless you are convinced that the petitioner will conform to the laws, rules and regulations of the institution

EXAMINATION OF VISITORS

  1. Appoint committee of three.
  2. Visitors must be examined individually.
  3. Current dues card.
    1. Check signature with one appearing on dues card.
  4. 4. Check Lodge name and number in directory.
    1. Be sure directory is up to date.
  5. Repeat the Tyler’s Oath. (page 184 in cipher) Need not be memorized in this State.
  6. Examination of ritual.
    1. Great Lights in each degree.
    2. Due-Guard, Signs, Grip & Word.
    3. Grand Masonic Word & manner.
    4. Relate story in extreme circumstances.
  7. Courtesy.
    1. No trick questions.
    2. Do not detain.
    3. Don't show off.
    4. Don't try to embarrass visitor.
  8. 8. Conclusion, (from S.R. #30)

A visiting brother, having produced his Grand Lodge certificate or diploma, or a current receipt for annual dues, and having satisfied the examining committee of a lodge that he is a Mason in good standing, and a member of a regular lodge, shall have the right to inspect the Charter or Charter Certificate of the lodge he desires to visit.

Every Lodge shall keep and preserve a record of visitors.

***

This subject is demonstrated on track 2 of the Masonic Protocol tape.***

***

This subject is contained in the District Representative’s Toolbox .***

Freemasonry Revealed

You may be asked at some point to give a short talk about Masonry to a group, which includes non-Masons. This outline should serve as a basis for such a talk. Use it according to your best judgment.

INTRODUCTION

As with many ideas which people know little about, there are misconceptions and erroneous information that give the general public some strange beliefs. We know that there are many beliefs surrounding Freemasonry and Masons. By shedding some light here, perhaps I can give you some insight on the organization that is considered the oldest and largest in the world – whose origin is lost in the mists of time. What should we talk about? Well, let's talk a little of the history and organization of Masonry, membership, what Masonry stands for, objectives and misconceptions.

I. History

A. Ancient fraternity

1. Operative Masonic Guilds of the Middle Ages

a. Operative Craft

(1) Reached its height from 10th to 16th Century

(a) Period of Gothic Architecture described as "The Frozen Music" of the Middle Ages or as "Prayers in Stone".

b. As Operative Class declined Speculative Members perpetuated the ideals

(1) Define Speculative Definition: Men unconnected with the building trade in any way. They were attracted to the moral and philosophical principles, which Free Masonry had inherited from antiquity.

B. Lodges, as we know them

  1. Four lodges in London formed the first Grand Lodge (year-1717)
  2. Year 1730 or so
    1. Lodges met in American Colonies
    2. Some had Grand Lodge authority, some did not

C. Organization

1. Lodges

a. Can legally exist by CHARTER or WARRANT from GRAND LODGE

2. Grand Master

a. Highest authority and supreme executive officer

II. Membership

A. Masonry does NOT solicit new members.

1. Any Man (stress this) interested must seek admission of his own free will and accord.

B. Applicant must have the following qualifications

  1. 21 years of age
  2. Mentally competent
  3. Good moral character
  4. Believe in the existence of a Supreme Being

C. Applicant must be recommended by 2 Master Masons, one of whom must be a member of that Lodge

D. Applicant will be investigated by a Committee of Inquiry

E. Applicant must pass a unanimous ballot. He then is eligible to receive the 3 degrees of a Symbolic or Blue Lodge:

Entered Apprentice

Fellow Craft

Master Mason

III. Masonic and Lodge Attitudes

A. Non-political

B. Non-denominational

C. Political and religious arguments or discussions are forbidden within lodges.

D. Consists of men of good character. Many have diverse political views and religious beliefs

E. Masons recognize one another only as friends and brothers, without regard to political party or religious beliefs

IV. Misconceptions about Masonry

A. It is a secret organization

  1. No, it is an organization with secrets
  2. Masonic Halls (Temples) are easily identified
  3. Constitutions, rules and regulations are open for any individual's inspection

B. Manners of recognition

  1. Like any "family" we have our methods of knowing a Mason from a non-Mason
  2. Non-Masons usually recognize Masons by the pin or ring they wea

V. Beliefs and Teachings

A. Accept good men and make them better.

B. Charity

  1. Financial and personal
  2. Non-members are often included in our charitable works
  3. We contribute and participate in local charities & community services a) Red Cross blood program b) Schizophrenic research c) Eye banks d) Multiple Sclerosis treatment e) Drug & Alcohol Abuse Prevention Programs f) Scholarships g) Learning Centers h) C.H.I.P.S. Program (Child Identification) i) Shriners

i. Crippled children's hospitals

ii. Burns institutes

CONCLUSION As I have said, one of Freemasonry's objectives is making good men better. Its teachings include brotherhood, morality, justice, tolerance, citizenship, education and freedom of ideas, of religious choice and of expression. The worth of the individual in society is another of its objectives, but it believes that this worth is only achieved by the recognition of the corresponding responsibility, which must accompany each privilege the individual enjoys. "Brotherly love, an elusive principle which Masonry tries to teach, is applied to the whole human race as one common family. This "family" was placed upon the world to support, aid and protect each other.

It has been written that, "Freemasonry is kindness in the home, honesty in business, courtesy in society, fairness in work, pity and concern for the unfortunate, resistance towards the wicked, help for the weak, trust in the strong, forgiveness for the penitent, love for one another and above all, reverence and love for God." Freemasonry is many things, but most of all FREEMASONRY IS A WAY OF LIFE.

 

Entered Apprentice Degree Checklist

Working a degree can be a lot of fun and a great experience for you and your officers as well as the Candidate. However, a good time and experience is not a guarantee by simply saying we are going to do it. You need to follow some simple steps to make sure the night goes forward with out a hitch.

As Master, your time will be much more enjoyable if you know your part well. This will be passed on to your officers and the candidate as they see you talk smoothly with out stopping often for prompts or sounding unsure of yourself. The first step is to prepare yourself. Sit down with your Cipher and Maine Masonic text Book and study your part. If you have trouble with words don’t guess or make up something that sounds good, contact a good reliable source from your lodge, your District Ritual Instructor or one of the Lecturers. (If you learn a word wrong it is very hard to learn it right later!) Once you can read through the cipher well, try it a few times with out the book. The best way to make sure you have it down is to practice out loud. If you only practice inside your head your own voice can throw you off when you go to say it out loud on the big night. Practice often, you can never have it down too well!

The following pages are guidelines for the Entered Apprentice degree. These are things that need to be remembered if you want a smooth flowing degree. Attached to each of these guidelines are checklists you can photocopy for each time you work that particular degree. By having a separate copy for each night you can literally check off the items as you do them.

Entered Apprentice Checklist

There are things that must be taken care off now in addition to your speaking part. As Master the entire night is your responsibility. A week or so before the degree, you will want to do the following:

-Notify the Candidate Tell him the Date of the degree Tell him the Time of the degree Let him know if there is a Meal or not and that he is invited

-Has someone been designated to: Talk with Candidate before degree (Accepted Candidate)? Prompt? Take every Station for the Degree? Do the Lectures? Do the Charge? Work with the Candidate after the Degree? Pick up the Candidate and take him home?

-Do you feel a Rehearsal needed? Are you opening in the EA degree? Do Officers know this? Do Officers know their parts?

On the night of the degree there are a few things that need to be taken care of.

-Make sure everyone who is supposed to be there is there

- Are Proper Clothes for Candidate in Anteroom? Hoodwink? Cable Tow? Slipper?

Are the following at Master’s Station? Working Tools (24 Inch Gauge and Common Gavel) White Apron for Candidate

Are Candles and Candle Sticks in place? Red = Senior Warden White = Master Blue = Junior Warden Are they lit?

- Is the Sharp Instrument handy at the Anteroom door?

-Has someone been designated to: Work lodge room lights? Run slides, if used? Greet the Candidate?

This checklist can be used as a reference when planning a Entered Apprentice Degree.

1. Officers (and backups, if possible, for the principles)

A. Master __

B. S.Warden __

C. J. Warden __

D. S. Deacon __

E. J. Deacon __

F. Secretary __

G. S. Steward __

H. J. Steward ___

I. Chaplain ___

J. Typer ____

K. Prompter _____

2. Candles

A. White, Red Blue    ____

3. Working tools (have ready for the Master)

A. 24 Inch Gauge __

B. Common Gavel __

4. S. Deacon’s tool

A. Sharp Implement __

5. Candidates clothing (all clean and in good condition)

A. Pants __

B. Shirt __

C. Slipper __

D. Cabletow __

E. Hoodwink __

6. Lectures (have someone ready and a backup)

A. Scripture during circumambulation __

B. Lectures __

C. Charge __

D. A knowledgeable Brother to run the slides, if used __

7. Handouts

A. Lesson book __

B. Pollard plan __

Fellow Craft Degree Checklist

Working a degree can be a lot of fun and a great experience for you and your officers as well as the Candidate. However, a good time and experience is not a guarantee by simply saying we are going to do it. You need to follow some simple steps to make sure the night goes forward with out a hitch.

As Master, your time will be much more enjoyable if you know your part well. This will be passed on to your officers and the candidate as they see you talk smoothly with out stopping often for prompts or sounding unsure of yourself. The first step is to prepare yourself. Sit down with your Cipher and Maine Masonic text Book and study your part. If you have trouble with words don’t guess or make up something that sounds good, contact a good reliable source from your lodge, your District Ritual Instructor or one of the Lecturers. (If you learn a word wrong it is very hard to learn it right later!) Once you can read through the cipher well, try it a few times with out the book. The best way to make sure you have it down is to practice out loud. If you only practice inside your head your own voice can throw you off when you go to say it out loud on the big night. Practice often, you can never have it down too well!

The following pages guidelines for the Fellow Craft degree. These are things that need to be remembered if you want a smooth flowing degree. Attached to each of these guidelines are checklists you can photocopy for each time you work that particular degree. By having a separate copy for each night you can literally check off the items as you do them.

FELLOW CRAFT CHECKLIST GUIDELINES

There are things that must be taken care off now in addition to just your speaking part. As Master the entire night is your responsibility. A week or so before the degree, you will want to do the following:

-Notify the Candidate Tell him the Date of the degree Tell him the Time of the degree Let him know if there is a Meal or not and that he is invited

-Has someone been designated to: Talk with Candidate before degree (Entered Apprentice)? Prompt? Take every Station for the Degree? Do the Charge? Work with the Candidate after the Degree? Pick up the Candidate and take him home? Give the Candidate his Lesson?

-Do you feel a Rehearsal needed? Are you opening in the FC degree? Do Officers know this? Do Officers know their parts?

SD giving the Staircase Lecture? Are you giving the Letter G lecture?

On the night of the degree there are a few things that need to be taken care of.

-Make sure everyone who is supposed to be there is there

- Are Proper Clothes for Candidate in Anteroom? Hoodwink? Cable Tow? Apron? Slipper?

-Are the following at Master’s Station? Working Tools (Plumb, Square and Level)

-Is the Square handy at the Anteroom door?

-Has someone been designated to: Work lodge room lights? Run slides, if used? Greet the Candidate?

Checklist

This checklist can be used as a reference when planning a the Fellow Craft Degree.

8. Officers (and backups, if possible, for the principles)

A. Master __

B. S.Warden __

C. J. Warden __

D. S. Deacon __

E. J. Deacon __

F. Secretary __

G. S. Steward __

H. J. Steward __

I. Chaplain __

J. Tyler __

K. Prompter __

9. Working tools (have ready for the Master)

A. Plumb

B. Level

C. Square

10. S. Deason's tool

11. Candidates clothing (all clean and in good condition)

A. Pants __

B. Shirt __

C. Slipper __

D. Cabletow __

E. Apron __

F. Hoodwink __

12. Lectures (have someone ready and a backup)

A. Scripture during circumambulation __

B. S. Deacon’s lecture __

C. Charge __

D. A knowledgeable Brother to run the slides, if used __

13. Handouts

A. Lesson book __

B. Pollard plan __

M.E.A.L.S.

Committee – rev. 2006

M.E.A.L.S.

Committee – rev. 2006

Master Mason Degree Checklist

Working a degree can be a lot of fun and a great experience for you and your officers as well as the Candidate. However, a good time and experience is not a guarantee by simply saying we are going to do it. You need to follow some simple steps to make sure the night goes forward with out a hitch.

As Master, your time will be much more enjoyable if you know your part well. This will be passed on to your officers and the candidate as they see you talk smoothly with out stopping often for prompts or sounding unsure of yourself. The first step is to prepare yourself. Sit down with your Cipher and Maine Masonic text Book and study your part. If you have trouble with words don’t guess or make up something that sounds good, contact a good reliable source from your lodge, your District Ritual Instructor or one of the Lecturers. (If you learn a word wrong it is very hard to learn it right later!) Once you can read through the cipher well, try it a few times with out the book. The best way to make sure you have it down is to practice out loud. If you only practice inside your head your own voice can throw you off when you go to say it out loud on the big night. Practice often, you can never have it down too well!

The following pages are written out guidelines for the Master Mason degree. These are the things that need to be thought of if you want to have a smooth flowing degree. Attached to each of these guidelines are checklists that you can photocopy for each time you work that particular degree. By having a separate copy for each night you can literally check off the items as you do them.

MASTER MASON CHECKLIST GUIDELINES

There are things that must be taken care off now besides just your speaking part. As Master the entire night is your responsibility. Several days to a week or more before the degree, you will want to do the following:

-Notify the Candidate Tell him the Date of the degree Tell him the Time of the degree Let him know if there is a Meal or not and that he is invited

-Has someone been designated to: Talk with Candidate before degree (Fellow Craft)? Prompt? Take every Station for the Degree?

Be Speaking Fellow Craft? Two Non-Speaking Fellow Craft? The Three Ruffians? Wayfaring Man?

Do the Lectures? Do the Charge? Work with the Candidate after the Degree? Pick up the Candidate and take him home? Give the Candidate his Lesson?

-Do you feel a Rehearsal needed? Do Officers know this? Do Officers know their parts?

SD does not carry rod in second section JW abandons his station for the second and third sections Marshal will set up procession for second section

On the night of the degree there are a quite a few things that need to be taken care of.

-Make sure everyone who is supposed to be there is there

- Are Proper Clothes for Candidate in Anteroom? Hoodwink? Cable Tow? Apron?

-Are the following at Master’s Station? Working Tools (All the implements of Masonry inc Trowel, Setting Maul)

Is the Compasses handy at the Anteroom door?

Are the three ruffian’s tools at the proper station? 24 inch square at South Gate? Square at the West Gate? Setting Maul and Canvas at the East Gate?

-Has someone been designated to: Work lodge room lights? Run slides, if used? Greet the Candidate?

This checklist can be used as a reference when planning on running the Master Mason Degree.

1. Officers (and backups, if possible, for the principles)

A. Master __

B. S.Warden __

C. J. Warden __

D. S. Deacon __

E. J. Deacon __

F. Secretary __

G. S. Steward __

H. J. Steward __

I. Chaplain __

J. Tyler __

K. Prompter __

2. Working tools (have ready for the Master)

C. 24 Inch Gauge __

B. Common Gavel __

C. Square __

D. Level __

E. Plumb __

F. Trowel __

3. S. Deacon’s tool

D. Compasses __

4. Candidates clothing (all clean and in good condition)

E. Pants __

B. Shirt __

C. Cabletow __

D. Hoodwink __

E. F. Apron __ Checklist cont.

5. Second Section

A. 24 Inch Gauge at South Gate __

B. Square at West Gate __

C. Setting Maul at East Gate __

D. Canvas __

E. Hoodwink __

6. Lectures (have someone ready and a backup)

A. Scripture during circumambulation __

B. 1st Gate __

C. 2nd Gate __

D. 3rd Gate __

E. Speaking Fellow Craft __

F. Fellow Craft __

G. Fellow Craft __

H. Wayfarer __

I. Lectures __

J. Charge __

K. A knowledgeable Brother to run the slides, if used __

7. Handouts

J. Lesson book __

B. Pollard plan __

 

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